Food Insecurity in the News: Starbucks Donates Unsold Food, College Students & Food Pantries, New Nutrition Labels

Our recent reading list of the people, places, and discussions taking place in food insecurity across the country.


Starbucks Finally Starts To Donate All of Its Unsold Food via Forbes

960x0So Starbucks recently announced that they will be donating 100 percent of their unsold food to charity. They currently are testing out a program in San Diego. When Starbucks announced their intentions, the company stated that they expect to donate five million meals to individuals and families this year and plan to eventually – over the next five years – be doing this at all of its 7,600 locations in the United States. By 2021, they say, they’ll have given away 50 million free meals.


What You Need to Know About Sugar and Nutrition Labels via National Geographic

The outgoing Obama Administration signals its nutrition priorities by making it easier for consumers to watch their sugar intake.


Stamford college students benefit from campus pantry via Stamford Advocate

1024x1024Colleges and universities from Purdue to South Florida to Penn State now offer pantries where students who might otherwise go hungry can stock up on healthy food. The College and University Food Bank Alliance, a national coalition, represents 207 schools with pantries. Four of them are in Connecticut, with Norwalk the only one in the southwestern corner of the state.

Open five days a week, the NCC pantry is being discovered by a growing number of students who can visit twice a month to stock up on groceries and daily for a grab-and-go snack of fruit or a granola bar.


These entrepreneurs are using technology to turn a profit on food waste via Vox

food-waste.0Food waste is bad for our wallets. It’s also bad for the environment — the equivalent of throwing away the water, energy, and other resources that go into growing it in the first place. But as interest in reducing food waste grows, so does innovation to make it happen. Take a look at what some creative businesses are doing to turn trash into treasure.

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